Scott McGill

Research Areas

Latin Poetry • Virgil • Late Antiquity

Scott McGill’s work focuses on Latin poetry, Roman history and culture, and the reception of classical antiquity. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University. At Rice, he has served as chair of the Department of Classical and European Studies (2015-18) and as interim director of the Humanities Research Center (2012). In 2017-18, he was co-director of a Rice Seminar entitled “Forgery and the Ancient: Art, Agency, Authorship.” In 2013, he received an NEH Research Fellowship, and he is currently a faculty fellow at Rice’s Center for Teaching Excellence (2016-19).

He is the author of three books mainly concerned with Latin literature and poetry: Virgil Recomposed (2005), Plagiarism in Latin Literature (2012), and Juvencus’ Four Books of the Gospels (2016). He is also co-editor of three volumes From the Tetrarchs to the Theodosians (2010), Classics Renewed: Reception and Innovation in the Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity (2016), and A Companion to Late Antique Literature (2018).    

He is currently completing a commentary on Virgil’s Aeneid 11 for Cambridge University Press. Other projects include a verse translation of the Aeneid; a biography of Virgil; and an edited volume based on the Rice Seminar on forgery. In addition, he is editor of Brill’s Research Perspectives on Classical Poetry.

 

Selected Publications

Commentary on Aeneid 11 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2019).

Juvencus’ Four Books of the Gospels (London: Routledge, 2016).

Plagiarism in Latin Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Virgil Recomposed: The Mythological and Secular Centos in Antiquity (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).

ed. (with Cristiana Sogno, and Edward J. Watts), From the Tetrarchs to the Theodosians: Later Roman History and Culture, 284–450 CE (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

ed. (with Joseph Pucci), Classics Renewed: Reception and Innovation in the Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity (Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 2016).

“Vergil in Late Antiquity,” in Gavin Kelly and Aaron Pelttari (eds.), Cambridge History of Later Latin Literature (Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2019).

“The Appendix Vergiliana,” in Charles Martindale and Fiachra Mac Góráin (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Virgil, 2nd edn. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2019).

with Laura Miguélez Cavero, “Christian Poetry,” in Scott McGill and Edward J. Watts (eds.), Blackwell’s Companion to Late Antique Literature (London: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018). 

“Minor opus moveo: Verse Summaries of Virgil in the Anthologia Latina,”  in Marco Formisano and Christina Shuttleworth Kraus (eds.), Canonicity and Marginality (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), 263-86. 

“Larger than Life: The Elevation of Virgil in Phocas’ Vita Vergiliana,” in Phillip Hardie and Anton Powell (eds.), The Ancient Lives of Virgil: Literary and Historical Studies (Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, 2018), 93-114. 

“Rewriting Ausonius,” in Jas Elsner and Jésus Hernández Lobato (eds.), The Poetics of Late Latin Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017), 252-77. 

“Ausonius at Night,” American Journal of Philology 135 (2014), 123-48.  

“The Plagiarized Virgil in Donatus, Servius, and the Anthologia Latina,” Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 107 (2013), 365-83.      

“Plagiarism or Imitation?  The Case of Abronius Silo in Seneca the Elder’s Suas. 2.19-20,” Arethusa 43/1 (2010), 113-31.   

“Recasting Virgil and Ovid in the Epistula Didonis ad Aeneam,” Classica et Mediaevalia 60 (2009), 177-99.  

“The Right of Authorship in Symmachus’ Ep. 1.31,” Classical Philology 104 (2009), 229-32.